25 Great Places to Camp or Visit

From A to W, from Southeast to Interior


1) Afognak Island State Park on Afognak Island is one of the nation’s first conservation areas. There are several cabins accessible by floatplane. The 44,000-acre park is mostly undeveloped and pristine and known for its old-growth Sitka spruce and salmon-spawning grounds.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

2) Baranof Castle State Historic Site is more commonly known as Castle Hill. Situated in downtown Sitka, it is among the most historically significant sites in the state. The Tlingit people who once inhabited the area built a strategic fortification here. It was occupied by the Russians between 1804 and 1867 and provides outstanding views of Sitka and waterfront areas.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

3) Bird Creek Campground (P. 542 MP) in Chugach State Park offers 28 sites for recreational vehicles up to 35 feet long, great views of Turnagain Arm and walk-to salmon fishing in Bird Creek. Biking trails and a sheltered picnic area also are available. It’s about 20 miles southeast of Anchorage.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

4) Blueberry Lake State Recreation Site (P. 469 MP) is at Mile 23 of the Richardson Highway near Valdez. There are 25 campsites, 15 picnic sites and four picnic shelters. Fishing and trails are nearby.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

5) Buskin River State Recreation Site (P. 647 MP) is on Kodiak Island. Visitors can walk the beach, fish, see a variety of wildlife, mountain bike and hike. The Buskin River is one of the most productive fisheries on the road system in Kodiak.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

6) Chena Lakes Recreation Area (P. 485 MP) has Lake Park Campground and River Park Campground. Both are part of the recreation area with many facilities available including a swimming lake, trails, fishing and boat rentals (P. 239 MP). It is about 15 miles southeast of Fairbanks near North Pole and the famous Santa Claus House, which is open year-round and sends Christmas letters to children worldwide during the holiday season.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

7) Childs Glacier Recreation Area Campground (P. 644 MP) adjacent to Childs Glacier, near the Copper River Highway outside of Cordova. Wake to the ground shaking and noise of an ever-moving glacier. Activities include bird and glacier watching, an interpretive display, picnic shelter and more. (This many not be accessible this summer because of road closure.)
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

8) Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve (P. 708-709 MP) was created by the state legislature to protect and perpetuate the world’s largest concentration of bald eagles and their habitat. It includes 50,000 acres, many rivers and glaciers and is also a salmon-spawning area. Camping is limited to 15 days.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

9) Eagle River Campground (P. 353 MP) is in Chugach State Park and sits along scenic Eagle River near the community of the same name, about 12 miles north of Anchorage. It has 57 sites, picnic tables, fire pits, water, flush toilets and a dump station.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

10) Eagle River Nature Center (P. 352 MP) is in Chugach State Park, about 40 minutes from downtown Anchorage. Campsites are hike-in only but include views of rivers, glaciers, lakes and more. Cabins and yurts are available for rent and each has a wood stove, firewood, outhouse, fire ring and plywood bunk beds, but no electricity or plumbing.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

11) Eklutna Lake Campground (P. 350 MP), in Chugach State Park and just north of Anchorage features about 50 campsites, water, latrines, picnic tables and fire pits. There is hiking, biking, horseback riding, climbing, fishing, boating and four-wheeler riding. Beautiful view of mountains and lakes, an overflow area with 15 sites and picnic shelter for group activities. Includes a day-use area.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

12) Fort Abercrombie State Historical Park (P. 648 MP), which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is primarily for tent camping but RVs can use the overflow parking area. It’s home to the Kodiak Area State Parks Headquarters and Visitors Center, about three miles outside of Kodiak. It is known for its unique historical and natural features such as World War II ruins, deep spruce forests, wildflower meadows and a trout-fishing lake.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

13) In Seward (P. 562 MP), the Fourth of July is a camp-where-you-can event and the Mount Marathon race is a part of the festivities. The city, about two-and-a-half hours from Anchorage, swells from 2,500 to about 40,000. There are vendors, a parade and much more.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

14) Homer Spit Campground (P. 620 MP) is adjacent to boardwalk shopping with beachcombing options. Recreational activities include fishing charters and sightseeing charters in beautiful Kachemak Bay.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors; and Terry Newell and Jenny Russell, Alaska Magazine readers

15) Nancy Lake Recreation Area includes South Rolly Lake Campground (P. 397 MP). Activities include fishing and canoeing. It is best known for the Lynx Lake Loop canoe trail, which winds eight miles through a chain of lakes.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors and Beverly Melven, Alaska Magazine reader

16) Nemo Point (P. 672 MP), about 14 miles south of Wrangell off the Zimovia Highway, is a U.S. Forest Service Recreation Area. It includes campgrounds, fire rings, grills, picnic tables and a spectacular view of Zimovia Strait and Etolin Island. Recommended by: The Milepost editors

17) Riley Creek Campground (P. 458 MP) in Denali National Park and Preserve has 147 sites just inside the park’s entrance. It has a nearby general store, but no electrical or water hookups for RVs. Fires allowed in designated areas.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

18) Russian River Campground (P. 578 MP) near Cooper Landing, about 110 miles south of Anchorage, has renowned fishing, trails to waterfalls and public-use cabins. It also provides mountain views and a comfort station. Bears are common in the area, so keep food in your vehicle.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

19) Tangle Lakes Campground on the Denali Highway (P. 499 MP) is newly renovated and offers amazing fall scenery along with fishing for grayling in the lakes.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

20) Twin Bears Camp is a State of Alaska facility at Milepost 30 on Chena Hot Springs Road, about 35 miles east of Fairbanks and is meant for large groups. Features include a secluded lake within the Chena River State Recreation Area. It has 48 sites with picnic tables and fire rings. A swimming beach, boat launch and Wi-Fi are available.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

21) The Waterfront Park Municipal Campground (P. 566 MP) in Seward offers great views and an easy walk to downtown. In addition to its skate park, playground and picnic area, it’s a great place to see eagles, sea otters and, sometimes, sea lions, seals and whales.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

22) Wickersham State Historic Site in Juneau is the home of Alaska’s pioneer judge, James Wickersham. It features the House of Wickersham, a large Victorian home, built on Nob Hill in 1898. Camping is nearby at Eagle Beach State Recreation Area (P. 698 MP) north of Juneau at Mile 27 of the Glacier Highway.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

23) Williwaw Campground in Portage Valley (P. 549 MP). Close to Begich Boggs Visitor Center and Girdwood, it offers glacier and salmon viewing (in August), bike and hiking trails and a comfort station. A great trail, dubbed the Trail of Blue Ice, is nearby.
Recommended by: The Milepost editors

24) Wonder Lake (P. 463 MP), at the foot of Denali at Mile 85 of the park road, is one of the most photographed sights in the park. It has the 28 closest tent sites to the mountain. Warning: Cloudy skies can obscure the mountain and the mosquitoes are fierce. Bring a head-net and enjoy the wildlife and scenery.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

25) Wrangell Petroglyph Beach State Historic Site (P. 672 MP) has the highest concentrations of petroglyphs in Southeast. There is beach access as well as an accessible boardwalk. It’s about a mile from the ferry terminal and there are no camping facilities at the site but there are campsites nearby.
Recommended by: Alaska Magazine editors

Most of these Alaska State Park campgrounds are listed with the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation. Visit Alaska DNR for more information. All state campgrounds are on a first-come, first-served basis. Campsites cannot be reserved in advance, unless they are operated by a contracted park concessionaire.


 

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