Letters - July-August 2011

Noell Boyer
Students at Kenai Central High School display collages that were made with pictures from Alaska magazine.

Magazines and Learning Thank you for sending several boxes of last year’s Alaska magazines to my school. My senior social studies students recently finished a unit on Alaska statehood and used the magazines to make collages titled “What is Alaska to Me?” They were also tasked with a writing assignment about why Alaska is special to them. They had a blast with the assignments, and really loved the magazines. Some have even said that, by reading the articles, they have realized Alaska is far more to them than just a place to live. I have great kids! Thank you for thinking of us instead of recycling the leftover magazines.

—Noell Boyer, social studies instructor Kenai Central High School

 

Noell, we love hearing good news like this. We are sending  you a copy of Alaska author Heather Lende’s latest book to say thanks. —Editor

 


Sign of Trouble The photo essay by Carl Battreall on Page 2 of the April issue depicted a striking photo of some algae on rocks in Campbell Creek. Although this is a nice photo, it depicts water pollution. This algae is probably a blue-green filamentous algae that typically grows in the presence of excess phosphorous and nitrogen. The excess nutrients are likely the result of environmental pollution from lawn and garden runoff or, even more concerning, from septic systems or even a municipal sewer. Although I’m not an aquatic biologist (I am a plant and animal biologist), I would suggest that the photographer notify Alaska Department of Natural Resources personnel and inform of the location of this photograph.

—Tom Zennie Cloverdale, Ind.


Don’t Be Cheap In the story about the man in Barrow finding a suitcase full of money and turning it into authorities  (Carver Recovers $50,000,” April 2011, Page 16), you forgot to mention whether the restaurant meal the money’s owner offered the finder as a reward came with a drink or if it was extra. Would the man who found the money also be responsible for the tip? It is people like that restaurant owner who make people have second thoughts about turning found items in to authorities.

—Jack Hrubik Sierra Vista, Ariz.


Alaska Stays With You Just wanted to let you know how very much I appreciate your wonderful magazine. I really look forward every month to the articles by Nick Jans. When I read them, I feel as if I am with him on his travels across the Great Land. It really is true, once you visit Alaska, when you leave, part of you stays there. Also, the photos are outstanding every month.

—Rodney Dalhouse New Bern, N.C.


Beavers Eat Fish I read the letter “Are Beavers Vegetarians?” from Don Thalman in Morgan, Utah, in the April issue  (Page 6) with interest. I live quite near where he fished at Sheep Creek and I am writing to say “Yes, beavers eat fish!” I, too, have seen beavers there eating fish and, whenever I tell someone, they always disagree and say beavers only eat vegetation. I’ve never seen a beaver with a live fish in its mouth, but have seen them with carcasses. Maybe they don’t go fishing, but take advantage of protein that would otherwise rot.

—Nancy Crowden Willow

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