Fighting eagles in Seward
View bears at Katmai.
Cruise with Kenai Fjords Tours
Drive the Dalton Highway
Visit puffins at the Sealife Center
July/August 2014 Alaska magazine

 

Featured Table of Contents

FIND THESE GREAT ARTICLES AND MUCH MORE IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF ALASKA MAGAZINE.

Katmai

Katmai National Park captured by Alaska's best photographers

Katmai National Park and Preserve is one of the best places on the planet to view brown bears fishing for salmon at the top of Brooks Falls. At times, thirty or so congregate, perched above the drop, mouths gaping open to snag leaping fish. In July, it's easy pickings for the bears and for tourists wanting to see them. But with over 4 million acres, Katmai teems with other wildlife and provides diverse terrain with smoking valleys and craters and rich shoreline. Step into another world, one that looks like the moon in some sections, a beach in others, and Wild Kingdom in between. Visitors can hike, kayak, raft, and camp, or stand at the viewing platforms for hours with camera in hand. Rivers and lakes support all five species of Pacific salmon to create an anglers paradise, as long as you don't mind a few bears for company...Read More

Naming the Wild

A wolf called Romeo

by Nick Jans

Beyond all others, Harry Robinson and his black Lab mix, Brittain, set an entirely different standard for social contact with Romeo. Close as it had begun, the connection between Harry, Brittain, and the wolf only deepened that second winter. Attraction and shared experience became interwoven, stretched across the frame of time. The three began to cover more ground together, wandering the forested slopes even higher along the West Glacier Trail as well as Dredge, and along the base of Thunder Mountain, man and dog following, in weather foul and fair, wherever the black wolf led. Increasingly, they were a pack according to social function: they patrolled territory; they rested and played—the latter, sometimes in a way that seemed to include Harry...Read More

Bear Encounters

Tales from the Alaska wilderness

Most travelers to Alaska are disappointed if they leave the state without a glimpse of the iconic land mammals found here—in particular, bears. And while there are black bears and polar bears here too, it's the brown bear most fear, revere, and want to espy at a distance. Because Alaska contains around 98% of the brown bear population in the United States, your chances of getting that coveted photograph are better here than anyplace else on earth. Still, it's best to keep one's distance. Signs and literature warn visitors to stay at least 50 yards from all bears, and 100 yards from a sow with cubs. It's too bad bears can't read. Regardless, the wilderness encounters you'll read in the next few pages serve as literal and metaphorical lessons—and everyone loves a good bear story, as long as they live to tell it...Read More

PLUS

Escape to southwestern Alaska

Flying to Lake Clark

Hiking Aniakchak: Walking on fire

Packrafting the Kongakut River

Drive-up Tundra 

Gear: Rainwear

An Interview with Rachel Weaver

And More!

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